Otto Schott Research Award

Together with his colleagues Matthias Will (left) and Stefan Nolte (right), physicist Andreas Tünnermann, professor at the Institute for Applied Physics in Jena, is working to optimize an ultrashort pulse fiber system in order to modify the refractive index of glass.
Gabriele Leoff, Mainz

Solid-State Lasers in Focus

Professor Andreas Tünnermann, a physicist working at the Institute for Applied Physics at the Friedrich Schiller University in Jena, Germany received the Otto Schott Research Award in 2003 for his research work in the field of solid-state lasers.

This year’s recipient received the award for his outstanding research results in the field of solid-state lasers, and especially for his pioneering work on high-power fiber lasers, short-pulse fiber lasers and fiber amplifiers. Professor Tünnermann uses glass and other materials for these developments.

Andreas Tünnermann (40) studied physics at the University of Hanover and received his doctorate there in 1992. Later that same year he became Head of Development at the Laserzentrum Hannover e.V., where he worked on continuous wave, diode-pumped higher power solid-state lasers. In 1997 he received the habilitation of the University of Hanover and in 1998 he was appointed Professor of Applied Physics at the Friedrich Schiller University in Jena. In the spring of 1998, he was named Head of the Institute for Applied Physics at the university, which currently has a staff of about 50.
The award, which includes a grant of 25,000 euros, was presented on the occasion of a national conference on glass science on May 27, 2003, in Leipzig, Germany. The curators of the “Ernst Abbe Fonds” congratu-late the winner of the Otto Schott Research Award of 2003. Left to right: Professor Donald Uhlman, award winner Professor Andreas Tünnermann, Dr. Udo Ungeheuer, Professor Gerd Müller.
Today, Professor Tünnermann’s main research activities are focused on light in spatial and temporal confinement. The importance of his research is substantiated in well over 100 publications in highly respected international journals, patents and conference presentations. Tünnermann also received the Röntgen Award and the WLT Award in recognition of his applied work.

Coupled with a grant of 25,000 euros, the Otto Schott Research Award recognizes outstanding achievements in basic research, technology and applications in the field of materials – especially glasses, glass ceramics, other optical materials and components made of these materials.

Alternating with the Carl Zeiss Research Prize, the Otto Schott Research Award is awarded every two years to support achievements of mainly young scientists in basic research, technology and applied technology in the fields of activity of the SCHOTT Group and the Carl Zeiss Group. The Donors’ Association for the Promotion of Science in Germany administers both awards. Young scientists from all over the world are invited to submit their work for consideration. Previous recipients include not only German physicists and chemists, but also scientists from the United States, Japan, Russia and other European countries.